Friday, April 29, 2011

My three joys in two days

The last couple of days have been full of activities -- tiresome, but rewarding.
I came to Accra for the G-Ghana Conference at the Alisa hotel (I actually cancelled two lectures I had to deliver, so I could attend this conference).

So what activities have I undertaken since Wednesday?
On Wednesday, I actually combed the whole of Accra (hyperbole) for a new battery to replace the dead one that was shamelessly squatting in the battery compartment of my Gateway NV5212u laptop! The search proved futile. I consoled myself by buying other computer accessories rather.

Thursday was the day I had been waiting for -- G-Ghana 2011 is here. I actually had a bit of trouble finding the Alisa Hotel. A lot of enthusiastic developers and tech geeks were there; I actually felt like a geek myself.
The Google team really had a lot to offer -- Chrome, HTML5, CSS3, Android, Maps, Mobile et cetera. In the course of the programme, I met a dude who showed me a place adjacent Busy Internet where I could actually get a battery for my laptop -- and guess what -- I actually did get one. My first joy. Another highlight of the day was when I joined the Eduction track of the conference. Participants were introduced to Eclipse and Google Web Toolkit. I went home fulfilled at the end of the conference. I couldn't wait for Friday.

I woke up on Friday morning feeling really great. I got to the Alisa Hotel environs and decided to pass by a bookshop close by. I walked in and found a book I have been looking for, for the past year -- Software Engineering by Ian  SommervilleMy second joy. I went back to the conference grounds and joined my teammate (we were divided into teams the previous day), Dr. Agyepong, so we complete the task given to us -- completing and enhancing a Picasa app demo. At the end of the day, the completed apps of participants were judged; ours won!
Then came the moment I still can't believe -- we were both rewarded with the new android IDEOS smartphone with google! My third joy.

The whole experience has been worthwhile and fulfilling, and if there's something I've learnt, it is the fact that, the more you teach, the more you understand; the more you give, the more you earn.  ;-)



   


Monday, April 11, 2011

Thinking Aloud

Growing up, I have always tried to be a good dude -- sometimes I have been successful; other times, not so successful. I am a product of my environment, I guess...

As everybody does, I have formulated my own principles along the way. These are solely to guide my ways and strengthen me, while differentiating me from others. Trust me, it's not so easy sticking to principles -- especially if you are free-spirited. Do circumstances direct our actions? Sometimes, they do (so I think).
I have been in certain situations that have made me take actions that defeat my principles -- and I felt really bad. It is moments like this that make me remember the saying, "Never Say Never."

But then, after assessing the situation again, I seem to understand why things had to go the way they did. My perceptions change, I gain a renewed insight, and my sensitive nature deepens.
"In all things, give thanks to God", so says the Good Book.

I guess all I am saying is that, we are not perfect as humans -- but it is no excuse to continue doing wrong.
Make a mistake -- by all means make a mistake -- but learn from it to help yourself and others!
People might see you as a saint -- if only they knew your imperfections! But hey, don't let it get to you. Live your life and perhaps add this principle of mine to yours: "Always try to be at peace with God, your neighbour and yourself".

All is well and Stay Blessed.

Friday, March 11, 2011

To ATM or Not To ATM?

Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) are computerised telecommunication devices designed to allow customers of a bank (predominantly), the convenience of making transactions easily.
This kind of banking, has caught on with Ghanaians to an extent that, a good number of the populace are now banking. The ATM, to most of us -- is a life saver.
However, these devices (in Ghana) are not so reliable as they should be. "Why and how", you might ask.
I really don't have an answer to it. It can get pretty frustrating sometimes.
For almost five days, the ATM of a bank I save with in Ghana is "temporarily out of service" -- and this is neither the first nor tenth time! It isn't only peculiar to my bank, but the other banks as well. It is REALLY frustrating! Some plans that are made can't see fruition, because most Ghanaians work from 8am - 5pm on weekdays; the banks close at about 4:30pm. The only way, these individuals can access their accounts is by using the ATMs.
Of course there are times the banks put the machines off for maintenance and  filling the cash cartridges with cash. Aside that, the constant breakdowns of the machines are overwhelming.
I believe our banks should really take a look at their ATMs and save their customers the heartaches and stress endured due to the breakdown of the machines.