Friday, January 2, 2015

Do we need to recycle polythene bags, or find an alternative?

Enactus CUCG's paper bags
The '80s and '90s in Ghana saw a country that dealt with sanitation consciousness in an almost 'effective' way.
Not recycling though. The practice of going green (mostly recycling) is one that is still alien to most Ghanaians.
Food sellers used natural materials: waakye was served in leaves, hausa koko was served in bowls/cups. Heck, Ghanaians went about buying food with their own containers (bowls, cups). 
The narrative is different now. Plastic and polythene everywhere. We are invariably generating filth in the name of packaging -- and branding.
It's as if we've developed an unspoken slogan, "If it's not in plastic/polythene, it's not edible".
But that should change -- and indeed it will change. A number of individuals are doing their bit to help grow a green economy. These include The Green Ghanaian (@AkyaaN), Golda Addo, The Wheel Story House .
A couple of initiatives I'd wish to share with you are from two student organisations at the Catholic University College of Ghana.
Enactus CUCG has embarked on a project of dealing with plastic bags being used as grocery bags, and packaging for fast food and other products. They are designing paper bags. These are biodegradable, above all other considerable reasons. I read of a young man in Kenya who's also began an enterprise, making such paper bags.
Aiesec CUCG also had an intern last semester who collected used water sachets, and designed dust bins from them. These he donated to some primary schools in some deprived communities.
I'm yet to learn this skill, and produce some free dust bins too. ;-) 
I know of a number of initiatives coming out this year. Do watch the Green Ghanaian space for updates.
We should harness the power of the sun.
We should get some energy from our shit.
We should sort out our rubbish, so recycling is easier.
We should ... we should ... we should stop complaining and start from somewhere.
Brainstorm. Collaborate. Just. Do. It.

Dust bins made from used water sachets

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