Showing posts with label user interface. Show all posts
Showing posts with label user interface. Show all posts

Monday, February 16, 2015

The Zoobashop experience

Cursor H-Series 5050W
So I've heard of Zoobashop from friends a number of times, and decided to try their services.
Zoobashop is an online shopping website launched in 2013, that makes it easier fro customers to have access to products online, and make purchases, which are delivered to them. Less hustle.
I created an account on their page, and ordered a Cursor H-Series 5050W.

It was a smooth ordering experience, and I had a number of options in paying for the item.
I chose to pay via a bank account of theirs.
As I live outside Accra, I had to pay extra for delivery.

Zoobashop's LOG IN page for registered users

However when I was tracking my the delivery, I didn't like the experience of logging back into my account (As a registered user). On two successive occasions, I hit the Register button instead of Login because of the placement of the buttons.

I think I would have a better, enjoyable experience, if the Login button was placed on top, or even to the left (if both buttons are placed on the same horizontal line)

What has been your experience with online shopping websites/platforms in Ghana?

Thursday, October 31, 2013

A case for 'local' user interfaces?

The tweet above got my attention. Most folks in Ghana still enjoy SMS and those with smartphones enjoy text-based apps like Whatsapp. (Do note that Whatsapp now has voice-enabled input functionality).
From the convo on twitter, one realises that my friend is concerned about folks who cannot read English. I am however of the view that, a great majority of such folks can read in their local tongues.

A suggestion for developers who wish to design text-based apps for non-English speakers can be to use an API from Kasahorow. This would afford them the flexibility of using local languages.
However, another cool approach for developers looking forward to implement text-based apps, would be to use voice in place of text.

When it comes to using visuals, a lot of work has to be done to come out with better metaphors. This is because I've been contemplating how User Interface designers (in Ghana -- and Africa) could come up with icons that are 'local' enough to be understood and appreciated by their users.

Is this necessary, though?

What would the icons be like? A basket instead of a shopping cart? An earthenware bowl in place of fork and knife?
Well, as I've stated, more research needs to be done to really get a hang of this. An argument will be that the world is a global village, no? But what of the 'local' folks?

Forgive me if my thoughts are not 'falling in place' now.
I'm an enigma to myself.