Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Think Ghana...

Do we have an official language in Ghana?
Yes we do -- English.
Do we have a national language?
No we don't -- errm -- yes we do.
No because all Ghanaians do not have ONE mother tongue. We have beautiful languages though.
Yes because, we have GHANA as the national language -- ONE Ghana.
So in all you do, remember our national language Ghana. Celebrate the beauty we have in our diversity.
You. Yes You. Think Ghana.

Monday, December 10, 2012

Quando eu votei :: When I voted

In the past couple of weeks, I have been intrigued by the Portuguese language. After 21 hours of studying the basics, I've decided to share a summary of my voting experience with you -- in Portuguese. Enjoy.

Na manha do dia sete de Dezembro, dois mil e doze, eu votei. Eu fui à estaçao a cinco minutos para sete horas. Eu tive que ligar uma fila longa. Votando comercou a sete horas e onze minutos. Depois de vinte minutos, nós tivemos que formar duas filas novas, usando nossos nomes. Teve muito caos, porque pessoas estiverem nas filas desde quatro horas horas na manha, mas depois disso, todo mundo ficou calmo e votando continuou.

You can read the full report -- in English -- on the GhanaDecides website.

Friday, August 31, 2012

Media for Democracy Event held in Sunyani

The US Embassy in Ghana sponsored a series of one-day conventions on how media and civil society can contribute to free and fair elections. The conventions were organised by the GJA.
I was privileged to partake in, and cover the Sunyani event for GhanaDecides.
In this post I share some pictures I took at the event.
Dr. A. Bonnah Koomson talking on the role of the media

A section of the participants at the event 
Mr. K. Aborampah-Mensah talking on the role of Civil SocietyOrganisatins

Mr. Bright Blewu of the GJA interacting with the CUCG's SRC


Snack time
Ms. McKenzie talking on Best Pracices



A couple of materials given to participants
For a full report on the event, click here.

Sunday, May 6, 2012

BlogCamp 2012 -- The Experience

Blog? Social Media? What has the Law got to do with Social Media? Oh, can I really make a living from blogs?
If these are questions you find yourself asking, then you should have been at the first-ever -- yes, you heard me -- first-ever Blogcamp event in Ghana, which took place at the AITI-KACE. The theme was Voice of a New Generation.

A Blogcamp is actually a gathering of bloggers (newbies and oldies) to discuss the world of blogs, share ideas, and find ways of using social media to impact their communities in a positive way. The event was organised by the largest association of bloggers in Ghana, BloggingGhana. Almost 400 participants 'invaded' the venue -- the burning passion and quest for knowledge was simply overwhelming.

I had awakenings, epiphanies and inspirations throughout the event.

Highlights

  • The first highlight of the event for me, was when we had the pleasure of interacting with Brett Morgan of Google via Google+ hangout, as he talked on "Making blogs graphical with HTML5" -- 'twas really cool.
  • The second was when Nana Yaw Asiedu was called upon to talk on "Social Media and the Law". I know a lot of the attendees share what I'm about to say. He was introduced as a lawyer and so the 'Ghanaian' mind expected to see an 'old' (used relatively) individual. But no, we saw this unassuming young man step up, take the mic, and 'school' us on the topic with undiluted authority. Mindblowing! I dubbed him, "The Coolest Legal mind at the event". ;-)
  • The breakout session on Photoblogging was amazingly handled by Nana Kofi Acquah.
    Mac-Jordan Degadjor's session on Social Media for Corporate bodies was engaging. I particularly love the point he momentarily turned the session into a 'mini movie theatre' by playing a video on 'What a Blog is'!
  • The main sponsor of the day, Vodafone Ghana had three raffles and gave prizes to winning participants. The prices included Android torres phones, Mi-Fis, and Web Boxes! Others also won free BloggingGhana T-Shirts -- myself inclusive. :-)
  • The biggest highlight for me was the launching of the Social Media Awards by Golda Addo.

Memorable Quotes

The day had its fair share of quotes that should be in ink:
We never really know where it'll lead us, but we have to start from a place of integrity.
~ Nana Kofi Acquah
" It's impossible to be politically correct as a blogger and be taken seriously. "
~ Nana Kofi Acquah
" You need to take a stance. It's either you are a mouse or a cat, you can't be a mat. "
~ Nana Kofi Acquah
" Truth is the best defence in defamation, but it should be truth you can prove. "
~ Nana Yaw Asiedu
" Those in most need are the ones to really exercise their democratic franchise. "
~ @kinnareads
" If for nothing at all, joining BloggingGhana allows you a lot of reach. "
~ Kajsa Hallberg Adu
" It annoys me that a lot of people are interested in poverty in Africa. "
~ Kobina Graham

It was a great event -- thanks to the organisers and the sponsors.
In the words of the in-law in a Ghanaian TV advert, I end by saying, "mE ba aha dabia abE didi"!

I know you folks have got other exciting experiences to share about the BlogCamp event. I'd love to hear them. Do leave a comment, and let's get interactive.

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Politics of traffic & street lights?

        So I have been living in the Sunyani Municipality (of Ghana's Brong-Ahafo Region) for the past 6 years -- and counting. It is a lovely town I must confess, well-planned and a far cry from the country's capital, Accra, in terms of congestion. The region is known as the 'breadbasket of Ghana'.
        One would have thought that the first-class streets, adorned with streetlights and traffic lights, would not just serve as monuments -- as the case is now. More often than not, these streetlights fail to function, and they can be off for over a fortnight with no one (especially the metropolitan assembly) attending to them. You only see the streetlights working again after a lot of 'noise' has been made on the FM Stations.
        Quite recently, we began having traffic wardens (police) directing traffic whenever the traffic lights go off -- which is commendable -- but doesn't solve the problem.
        However, an incident I saw a couple of days ago worried me greatly.
        It was about eight minutes to six in the evening and the traffic was really heavy. Drivers were tooting their horns at one another -- in short, it was chaotic. I wondered where the warden was (as were the other passengers), only to see him at a distance -- on phone! His countenance was one of an individual oblivious to his immediate surroundings.
       But he is not to blamed entirely. What are our leaders doing about such mishaps in our communities? Next to nothing, if you ask me. They spend copious amounts of time on the airwaves talking politics! Discussing issues that are so trivial (sometimes) that, they need not over-hype them.
      Someone calls another a palm-wine tapper -- and so what?
      Another calls his opponent 'kokoase kurasini' (a villager from a cocoa-farming community) -- and so what?
We really need to up our game and stop this 'disgusting' approach to addressing societal issues.
Drivers doing their own thing -- Chaos!
Find your own way?